Zoo and Wildlife Park Diesel Generators

Zoo, Wildlife Park Diesel Generators

 

Zoo and Wildlife Park Diesel Generators

Electrical power is pretty much relied on by everyone living in industrialized countries. We use it every single day to power our homes, cook our food, to be able to see in the dark, and many more. When we lose power, it is really easy to find solutions. We know what to do in order to keep our food safe, keep ourselves warm (or cool if you live somewhere warm), and how to get by if the power stays out for too long. But what happens when the electrical power fails at the Zoo? Do zoos have the capacity to be able to protect and nourish the animals when the power fails?


There is a lot to worry about when the power goes out at a Zoo (or anywhere that houses wild animal species). How will the animals be fed? How can their environments be controlled properly? A lot of things can be affected by power outages in a Zoo setting, and a lot of animals can suffer from the problems that can be caused.

Zoo and Wildlife Park Diesel Generators

Maintaining an ideal temperature is very critical for the welfare of zoo animals. In the winter, when cold weather begins to settle in, animals that are not well adapted to handle the cold need to be able to be taken care of. Without electrical power or proper backup power, these animals can suffer tremendously and possibly die as a direct result. Zoos have multiple controlled climate areas for the animals they house. If the power fails, the temperature can no longer be controlled. Consider the desert section of a zoo. If there is no power to heat that environment, and the situation is not handled quickly, the animals may not be able to survive the climate they are being exposed to. Even if the animals are moved from their “display areas,” without power, the chances of them being able to adapt are small. This problem could cost zoos a lot of money and harm a lot of animals. The same goes for animals that are used to living in colder climates. The water and exhibit that polar bears are kept in are controlled to keep the water and the area around it freezing so the animal can survive. If power is lost, whatever is being used to control the temperature of the water and the exhibit will shut off causing the animal to have to adapt to warm weather that it may not be able to handle.

Zoo and Wildlife Park Generators

Another critical issue facing zoo animals in the event of a power outage is the preservation and retrieval of food. Each animal in each exhibit has a specific diet and food plan that needs to be followed. Out in the wild, these animals have access to the food they need without having to worry about whether or not it will spoil. However, zoos keep their food in controlled settings specific to each animal’s dietary preferences. Much like in the home, if the power drops at a zoo, the amount of time that the food will stay safe to be consumed begins to drop rapidly. This is even more crucial in zoos because they generally keep their food stocked in large walk-in refrigerators behind the exhibit. Some of these walk-ins can be as big as a small house. And, the bigger the area the food is stored, the faster it is going to go bad. There is also the issue of procurement. Sometimes the power outages can be caused by inclement weather or disasters. In these events, animals from the zoo are rarely evacuated as it can cause them further trauma to be moved around. This can be an issue too, as some animals rely on daily shipments of fresh food, and that cannot be delivered if the weather is dangerous. It can also be very difficult for delivery drivers to get into the zoo with no power since many doors are locked electronically. This can pose a very dangerous threat to animals if the problem persists or lasts more than a day or two.

Zoo and Wildlife Park Generators

Food is not the only thing that can become unusable in a zoo power outage. Many of the animals get their water through a filtration system. For example, the “watering holes” that are designed into the exhibit for the animals to drink from usually run on a pump system. These systems keep water flowing enough that the animals cannot run out of water at any time. However, if the power goes out, and the outage lasts for more than a couple of days, the water will run out because the pumps are no longer working to keep the holes filled. This also affects the animals that live in habitats that require clean and filtered water. This could be aquariums and exhibits that house alligators or otters. Without power to pump the water and clean it, these animals will be forced to live in a grimy, murky mess which overtime can threaten the health of the animal. Animals that rely on water to survive, like fish, cannot last a long period of time if the water is not being maintained. This can be very detrimental to the zoo and very pricey.

Quiet Generator for Zoo and Wildlife Parks

Most zoos have backup generators to help solve this issue. However, if the generator is fueled by petrol, it is likely to be very pricey and may not last as long as needed. Diesel generators, however have the ability to power small towns (which are similar in size to a zoo or aquarium), and they last much longer than petrol generators. It has also been shown that outages with diesel generators are less likely to happen as the life expectancy of these machines is almost triple that of a petrol one. If the zoo has set up a diesel system, all of these problems become less serious. These generators can keep the zoo running when the electricity goes out. The temperature controlled areas can be kept safe. The food can be kept cold (or warm), deliveries can be made for those that require fresh food daily, and the water can be cleaned, filled, and filtered to fit the animal’s need. If you want to avoid a potential disaster in your zoo when the electrical power fails, look into installing a back-up generator that runs on diesel fuel to ensure that the animals will be safe and well cared for.