Electric Generator

Electric Generators

The electric generators on this page are organised in kVA (power) size order. for larger sizes scroll down the page

Electric Generator Sets

electric generator


Despite the name, electric generators do not “create” electrical energy. Energy cannot be created or lost, after all. Instead, electrical generators are devices that convert one type of energy into another. Most commonly, kinetic energy (physical force or motion) is turned into electrical current in a process called electromagnetic induction.

Electric generators are often compared to electric motors because they essentially work in the opposite way as each other. Electric motors turn electricity into motion, electric generators turn motion into electricity.


Electric Generators, how do they work?

The principles behind the operation of all modern-day diesel generators are based on the work of British Scientist, Michael Faraday, who discovered the principles of electromagnetic induction. He discovered that a changing magnetic field perpendicular to a copper wire will produce voltage in the wire. He also discovered that when the wire is wrapped into a coil, the voltage produced within the wires is directly proportional to the number of turns in the coil and the resulting change in the magnetic field.

As a result of Faraday’s discoveries, all generators, open or silent generators consist of the stationary magnetic field, also known as a stator, and the armature, a rotating electromagnet that spins within it. When the conductor moves inside the magnetic field, the resulting magnetism will interact with the electrons, moving them to induce a flow of electric current.

Converting kinetic energy into electric current
Since they cannot create the energy, all power generators require something to provide the force that create the spinning motion that results in the conversion to electric current. Most commonly, this force is provided by burning diesel or gasoline. Gasoline and diesel-powered generators use a combustion engine, the heat of which powers a rotating shaft that, in turn, turns the armature.

There are many other kinds of electric generators powered by different sources of force. Renewable types of energy can be burned, while wind and water can be used to spin a turbine. Smaller generators can even be powered by humans, like hand-crank radios. All the electricity we use comes from some kind of generator supplied by some kind of force, with the only exception being solar cells.



Electric Generator Components

To help you better understand the mechanics of the average electric generator, let’s take a look at some of the key components involved in the process:

· The engine: This is what produces the input energy that is to be converted into electric energy. In the case of a crank radio, it’s the hand crank turned by the human. For most modern generators, it is the combustion engine in which diesel or other fuels or burned.
· The alternator: This is where the process of turning kinetic energy into electric current happens. In it, the stator is the stationary component that contains electrical conductors wound around an iron core. The armature or rotor is the moving component, powered by the kinetic energy, that generates a moving magnetic field. This creates a voltage difference between the windings of the stator, which creates an alternating current. To turn AC into DC, a transformer or a commutator can be used.
· The fuel system: Since most modern generators are powered by some kind of fuel, a fuel tank is most often used to store it. For smaller generators, a fuel tank can be mounted on top of its frame, while larger generators for commercial use will usually have an external tank erected nearby. From the tank, a pipe offers a direct supply of fuel to the engine and vice-versa.
· The voltage regulator: This component regulates the output voltage of the generator
· Cooling systems: When in motion, the components of the combustion engine (fuel system) and the alternator can produce a lot of heat. Cooling and ventilation systems allow the system to regulate that heat, often using a fan to produce cool air, water, or even hydrogen for large generators.
· Exhaust systems: Exhaust fumes from generators and their engines can contain highly toxic chemicals. Exhaust systems help to dispose of those fumes safely, such as pipes of cast iron or steel that are attached directly to the engine and lead outdoors.
· Lubricating systems: The moving parts of the generator cause a lot of friction, which can cause them to overheat if they’re not often lubricated. Lubricator oil is most often stored in a pump where it is fed into the engine to keep the components working efficiently.
· The main assembly: This is also known as the frame. It’s a housing that contains all the main components of the generator and provides support for the individual parts, as well as earthing it for safety.
· The control panel: Many modern generators have an electronic interface that allows users to monitor and control many functions of the generator. The features on the control panel can vary from generator to generator, but most often they include a function that starts the generator automatically if the power fails and stops the generator when the regular power supply is back to full strength. There are also engine and generator gauges that can show information on things like oil pressure, coolant temperature, battery voltage, engine rotation speed, output current and voltage, operating frequency, and more.

There have been many different kinds of generators created using the principles outlined above. There are generators available of all kinds of different sizes measured in kVA, here at Diesel Generator Direct we stock Silent Generators from 5kVA up to 2000kVA with 20kVA and 10 kVA Generator sizes being the most popular sizes for a backup home generator from portable devices to much larger ones built for commercial use. As mentioned, there have been generators created using all kinds of energy sources, too. From gasoline, diesel, propane and natural gas to wind, water, and human operation, so long as the motion that turns the armature inside the alternator is provided, any form of energy can be converted into electrical current.

Generators are a standard part of life today. They supply all the electricity we use, and many will buy their own generators to produce their own electrical energy apart from the grid, especially helpful in emergency situations when the main power supply fails. To learn more about different electric generators and what they can do for you, take a look through the options available on Diesel Generator Direct.

Electric generators from Diesel Generator Direct

If you are currently in the market for a diesel generator to convert your mechanical energy into electrical and deliver your electrical power all the time as either a backup for power outages from the main grid or for prime power (to run continuously). Whether it be an electric start or manual, if you are looking for a portable generator, a home generator or silent generator, we have the right kVA powered equipment in stock to service you with the best diesel generator, get in touch with our team for more information or to make a purchase.

Call: +44 (0) 1977 657 989 or email: enquiries@dieselgeneratordirect.uk

Items 1-12 of 102

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  1. 106 kVA Perkins

    116kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · GSW115P
    400V Only
    3 Phase · Key Start

    £14,964.00
    Ex Works + VAT
  2. 5 kVA Yanmar

    6kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · P6000
    230V Only
    Single Phase · Key Start

    £2,414.00
    Ex Works + VAT
  3. 5 kVA Yanmar

    6kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · P6000
    230V / 115V
    Single Phase · Key Start

    £2,618.00
    Ex Works + VAT
  4. 7 kVA Perkins

    8kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · GBW10P
    230V Only
    Single Phase · Auto Start

    £4,487.00
    Ex Works + VAT
  5. 8 kVA Lombardini

    9kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · P9000
    230V Only
    Single Phase · Key Start

    £3,341.00
    Ex Works + VAT
  6. 9 kVA Perkins

    10kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · GSW10P
    400V Only
    3 Phase · Auto Start

    £5,030.00
    Ex Works + VAT
  7. 9 kVA Perkins

    10kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · GBW10P
    400V Only
    3 Phase · Key Start

    £4,200.00
    Ex Works + VAT
  8. 9 kVA Perkins

    10kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · GBW10P
    400V Only
    3 Phase · Auto Start

    £4,537.00
    Ex Works + VAT
  9. 9 kVA Perkins

    10kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · GBW15P
    230V Only
    Single Phase · Auto Start

    £4,794.00
    Ex Works + VAT
  10. Pramac Lombardini Silent generator
    SALE
    10 kVA Yanmar

    11kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · P11000
    230V / 115V
    Single Phase · Key Start

    Special Price £3,399.00 Regular Price £3,594.00
    Ex Works + VAT
  11. 10 kVA Yanmar

    11kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · P11000
    230V Only · Includes ATS
    Single Phase · Auto Start

    £3,928.00
    Ex Works + VAT
  12. 13 kVA Perkins

    14kVA Standby
    PRAMAC DIESEL · GBW15P
    400V Only
    3 Phase · Key Start

    £4,400.00
    Ex Works + VAT
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